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ebusiness-and-ecommerce-sigebiz-track-updated

Matt Nelson, Illinois State University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Michael Shaw, University of Illinois This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Troy Strader, Drake University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Chandra Subramaniam, University of North Carolina – Charlotte This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The eBusiness and eCommerce Special Interest Group (SIG) has assisted with coordinating research tracks at the America’s Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS) for more than 15 years.  Over the course of this timeframe, the eBIZ SIG has greatly benefited from a stable, responsive and reliable group of mini-track chairs, SIG leaders, contributing authors, reviewers and panelists. The eBIZ SIG tracks received approximately 30 paper submissions in 2014 and 45 submissions in 2013.

Track Description

For AMCIS 2015, SIGeBIZ is proposing the focus of the tracks to be on technical, behavioral, design and strategic research issues associated with all forms of e-business and e-commerce.  This encompasses studies of Internet-enabled transactions between consumers, businesses, and other organizations, as well as use of Internet technologies within organizations.  The studies may utilize any research methodology.  Related online business topics such as legal, ethical, and societal issues would also fit in this track.  Five mini-tracks are proposed for this track pertaining to Business Models, Supply Chain Management and Social Media & Commerce.    The list of Mini-Track Descriptions and Chairs are provided below.

Mini-Tracks

Business Models for the Digital Economy

Hans-Dieter Zimmermann

Information Technology (IT)-enabled Supply Chain Management: Co-Creating and Capturing Business Value from IT

Samuel Fosso, Ygal Bendavid, and Thomas Tamo Tatietse

Social Media and Social Commerce

John E Erickson and Keng L Siau

Collaborative Consumption

Stuart J. Barnes, Kem Z.K. Zhang, Andrew D. Pressey, and Eusebio Scornavacca

Wisdom, Labor and Money From the Crowd: Crowdsourcing, Online Labor, and Crowd Funding Marketplaces

Kevin Hong


Business Models for the Digital Economy

Hans-Dieter Zimmermann, Institute for Information and Process Management IPM This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

This mini-track serves as a forum for the presentation and discussion of new and innovative approaches of business models beyond e-commerce for coping with the challenges of the digital economy. We consider an economy based on the digitization of information and the respective information and communication infrastructure as digital economy. This new type of economy implies not only technological, but also and especially structural and process-related challenges and potential. The way in which economic value is created will change fundamentally in the digital economy and thus transform the structure of economies and societies.

This evolution will radically alter processes and structures within and between industries leading to the digital economy. All of these developments characterize the emerging digital economy and cause new challenges businesses have to cope with. This clearly will have a major impact on how business models have to be designed.

Call for Papers

This minitrack serves as a forum for the presentation and discussion of new and innovative approaches of business models beyond e-commerce for coping with the challenges of the digital economy. We consider an economy based on the digitization of information and the respective information and communication infrastructure as digital economy. This new type of economy implies not only technological, but also and especially structural and process-related challenges and potential. The way in which economic value is created will change fundamentally in the digital economy and thus transform the structure of economies and societies.

This evolution will radically alter processes and structures within and between industries leading to the digital economy. All of these developments characterize the emerging digital economy and cause new challenges businesses have to cope with. This clearly will have a major impact on how business models have to be designed. Therefore this minitrack addresses all topics concerned with the analysis, design, development, implementation, and control of future business models for the creation of economic value in the digital economy from a communication, organizational, business, economic, and managerial perspective applying a theoretical, conceptual, or practical approach.

Potential Topics:

Challenges and foundations of the digital economy

Analytical and architectural frameworks for new business models

Business Model generation

Disruptive Business Models in the Digital Economy

Design approaches/methods for new business models

Models and modeling techniques/approaches for new business models

Industry perspectives on business models

Social Media and Social Networks based business models

Challenges of converging industries:

Financial industry (e.g., emerging intermediaries, private/retail banking, insurance)

Media industry (e.g., publishing, music business)

Telecommunications (e.g., mobile network operators)

A business model perspective on

Mobile Business

‘Ubiquitous Commerce’

‘Collaborative Commerce’

Social Commerce

Trust and new business models

History

Hans-Dieter Zimmermann began the Business Models for the Digital Economy minitrack in the year 2000, Ian MacInnes joined as co-chair from 2004 to 2014. Over these years the minitrack has developed a vibrant community of scholars that has generally resulted in at least three sessions over the 10 year period while accepting between 50 and 60% of paper submissions. We have averaged about 25 attendees at our sessions. We would be happy to celebrate our 16th offering at AMCIS 2015.

See http://www.amcis-businessmodels.hdzimmermann.net/ for more details


Information Technology (IT)-enabled Supply Chain Management: Co-Creating and Capturing Business Value from IT

Samuel Fosso, Wamba NEOMA Business School and UNISA This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Ygal Bendavid, UQAM This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Thomas Tamo Tatietse, The Ecole Polytechnique, University of Yaoundé This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

This mini-track aims to look at how to co-create and capture business value from new concepts/technologies both at the firm and SC levels.The preoccupation with supply chain management (SCM) has been present over the last few decades. Early studies pointed to the need to increase the level of integration of IT-enabled for competitive advantage. The advent of new concepts/technologies should accelerate this trend by allowing greater visibility of products and services to SC members –, and in parallel offer more opportunities for quick and efficient SC activities. SC members should therefore face greater strain when managing their own activities as well as integrating of upstream and downstream core business processes and inter- and intra-organizational information systems. In this context, collaboration between the SC stakeholders to co-create and capture value from ITs and related concepts for their economic growth sustainability becomes not only a prerequisite, but also a major challenge.


Social Media and Social Commerce

John E Erickson, University of Nebraska at Omaha This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Keng L Siau, Missouri University of Science and Technology This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

This mini-track recognizes the emerging importance of social media and social commerce to businesses and organizations, and highlights the quickly changing environment and development in this field. This mini-track provides a forum for researchers, educators, and practitioners working in the areas of social media and social commerce. The mini-track serves as an outlet for studies related to technology, business models, protocols, industry experiences, legal aspects, security issues, and innovations in social media and social commerce. We welcome all aspects of research related to social media and social commerce and are open to all types of research methods (e.g., simulation, survey, experimentation, case studies, action research, etc.).


Online Collaborative Consumption

Stuart J. Barnes, Kent Business School, University of Kent This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Kem Z.K. Zhang, School of Management, University of Science and Technology of China This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Andrew D. Pressey, Birmingham Business School, University of Birmingham This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Eusebio Scornavacca, Merrick School of Business, University of Baltimore This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

This minitrack examines the nature and implications of a new and emergent strand of social commerce – collaborative consumption – where the emphasis is on sharing rather than owning assets and where people consume together. Collaborative consumption websites (including, for example, AirBnB, RelayRides, TaskRabbit and NeighborGoods) allow resources such as space, goods, skills or services to be shared. Such developments have been influenced by sustainability issues including economic austerity, wasteful consumerism, and global warming and environmental pollution. This minitrack welcomes conceptual and empirical research examining this emerging phenomenon using a variety of epistemologies and methodologies. Collaborative consumption is potentially very disruptive to many industry sectors and can be considered an example of Blue Ocean Research: a new and uncontested but potentially high-impact phenomenon.

Call for Papers

The rapid expansion of websites based upon collaborative consumption business models is paving the way for a so-called “sharing economy” (Buczynski, 2013; Gansky, 2010) where the dominant consumption logic is shifting from product ownership to product usage, i.e. individuals are mainly interested in using products rather than owning products (Bardhi and Eckhardt, 2012; Belk, 2014). Collaborative consumption websites focus on peer-to-peer marketplaces where unused space, goods, skills, money, or services can be rented, borrowed, bartered, traded, and swapped (Botsman and Rogers, 2011). Collaborative consumption is a form of social commerce, where online peer-to-peer commercial activities are facilitated through social networking technologies. According to Booz and Co., the global social commerce market for physical goods and services is predicted to grow from $5 billion in 2011 to $30 billion by 2015 (Anderson et al., 2011). By focusing upon sharing as a predominant form of exchange, these models are rapidly emerging in significance due to a convergence of technological, social and economic factors such as online connectivity, environmental consciousness, and the current economic downturn (Agyeman et al., 2013; Benkler, 2011; Fremstad, 2014; John, 2013).

Collaborative consumption websites based upon sharing values are expected to disrupt significantly conventional modes of commerce by transforming the way people consume. This posits profound implications not only for individual consumers, but for society, the retail industry, charities, and related stakeholders. However, collaborative consumption through online channels is currently not well understood and the limited amount of conceptual research and anecdotal evidence suggests that the purchase process is being redefined and that individual motivations are likely to be quite different to previous social sharing initiatives such as open source software or file-sharing (Benkler, 2011; Giesler, 2006). This mini-track welcomes original, innovative, multi-method and cross-disciplinary research that seeks to explore, explain or predict this emerging phenomenon.

Potential Topics:

User adoption of collaborative consumption websites.

Consumer behavior in collaborative consumption.

Case studies of collaborative consumption.

Social sharing theory and collaborative consumption.

Social networking analysis of collaborative consumption communities.

Sustainability theory and collaborative consumption.

Economic modelling of collaborative consumption.

Modelling rent versus buy decision-making behaviour.

 

References:

Agyeman, J., McLaren, D. and Shaefer-Borrego, A. (2013). Sharing Cities. Friends of the Earth, London.

Anderson, M., Sims, J., Price, J., and Brusa, J. (2011). Turning “Like” to “Buy”: Social Media Emerges as a Commerce Channel. Booz, Houston.

Bardhi, F. and Eckhardt, G.M. (2012). Access-based consumption: The case of car-sharing. Journal of Consumer Research, 39, 881-898.

Belk, R. (2014). You are what you can access: Sharing and collaborative consumption online. Journal of Business Research, 67(8), 1595-1600.

Benkler, Y. (2011). The Penguin and the Leviathan. Crown, New York.

Botsman, R. and Rogers, R. (2011). What's Mine Is Yours: How Collaborative Consumption is Changing the Way We Live. Collins, London.

Buczynski, B. (2013). Sharing is Good. New Society, Gabriola Island.

Fremstad, A. (2014). Gains from sharing: Sticky norms, endogenous preferences, and the economics of shareable goods. Economics Working Paper 168. University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Gansky, L. (2010). The Mesh. Penguin Group, New York.

Giesler, M. (2006). Consumer gift system. Journal of Consumer Research, 33, 283-290.

John, N.A. (2013). Sharing, collaborative consumption and Web 2.0. Media@LSE Working Paper No. 26, LSE, London.


Wisdom, Labor and Money From the Crowd: Crowdsourcing, Online Labor, and Crowd Funding Marketplaces

Kevin Hong, W. P Carey School of Business, Arizona State University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

Recently, there is a burgeoning of Internet-enabled marketplaces that harness the wisdom, labor and money from the crowd, to facilitate idea generation, labor exchange and funding of innovative projects. The scale of such markets and their impact on society is huge. For example, Freelancer, one of the online labor markets, has over 13 million registered users, other prominent marketplaces include Amazon Mechanical Turk, 99Designs, Innocentive, Zhubajie, etc.

Notably, these crowd based marketplaces and the crowdsourcing economy have attracted much attention from IS academic scholars. Notably, these different types of online marketplaces offers new opportunities to understand information systems and related problems, such as new product development in crowdsourcing marketplaces (Huang et al. 2014); communication and coordination in software development (Hong and Pavlou 2013) and auction design in online labor markets (Hong et al. 2014); social influence of contribution patterns (Burtch et al. 2013) in crowd funding marketplaces. Obviously, more innovative research is warranted in this research stream, given the scale and societal impact of these markets.

In this mini-track, we seek to receive submissions of papers related to these three types of marketplaces below, with topics including but not limited to the following. We also welcome research using different data and methodologies, such as econometrics, field or lab experimentation, field surveys, analytical model, or grounded theory approaches.

Potential Topics:

Crowdsourcing contest marketplaces

New product development

Value co-creation

Contest performance

Contest design

Online labor markets

Auction design

Auction performance

Effect of online labor markets on local economy

Global dynamics

Crowd funding marketplace

Signaling

Social capital

References

Burtch, G., Ghose, A., & Wattal, S. (2013). An empirical examination of the antecedents and consequences of contribution patterns in crowd-funded markets. Information Systems Research24(3), 499-519.

Huang, Y., Singh, P. V. and Srinivasan, K. 2014. “Crowdsourcing New Product Ideas under Consumer Learning,” Management Science, forthcoming

Hong, Y., C. Wang and P. A. Pavlou. “Open Versus Sealed Bid Auctions: Empirical Evidence from Online Labor Markets.” NET Institute Working Paper

Hong, Y. and P. A. Pavlou. “Is the World “Flat”? Evidence from An Online Labor Market.” Working Paper


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