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ICTs in Global Development (SIGGlobDev) Track

Narcyz Roztocki, State University of New York at New Paltz This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Piotr Soja, Cracow University of Economics This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

H. Roland Weistroffer, Virginia Commonwealth University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Track Description

Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have a major impact on economic and societal development. Though developing, emerging, and transitional economies play an increasingly important role in the global market, mainstream information systems research continues to focus on the relatively small group of countries with highly developed economies. The business, social, and legal environments of less developed economies often mandate that ICT implementation and management apply different practices and models from those conceived and tested in highly developed countries. The intention of this track is to encourage more research and publications on ICT focused on developing and emerging markets and communities.

Thus, this track serves as a forum for research on the appropriate use and diffusion of information and communication technologies and associated management practices in the distinctive environments of developing, emerging, and transitional economies.


Education and ICT in Developing Regions

Sergey Butakov, Concordia University College of Alberta This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

This mini-track aims to facilitate the discussion on topics related to education and ICT in developing regions, especially with the links to such emerging trends as Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), cloud computing and social media. Despite many promising efforts, there is still a significant divide between implementation of these emerging trends in developing and developed countries. The mini-track welcomes discussions on the following topics in the context of developing and emerging economies: Challenges in ICT implementation in the educational sector; Social media and user generated content in education; Learning management systems; ICT as “flat world” enabler in education, MOOCs; Cloud computing in education; Curriculum challenges for ICT programs; Gender issues related to ICT in the educational sector; Case studies on ICT and education.


ICT Issues in Arab and Middle Eastern Countries

Mazen Ali, University of Bahrain This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Yousuf Al-Hinai, Sultan Qaboos University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Fayez Algahtani, King Saud University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

Over the last few decades much of the Information Systems (IS) research has been focused on developed countries. While more recently there has been a noticeable increase in the number of IS studies in developing countries, these studies have mainly been specific to East Asian and Pacific countries. Middle Eastern countries, however, have witnessed tremendous growth in ICT development but research on this important topic has been limited. These countries have a different social, economic and cultural context compared to East Asian and other developing and developed countries. Better understanding adoption of ICT and the issues faced by these countries in the process of implementation would help practitioners in the Middle East and be a valuable contribution to the IS field. Therefore, the objective of this mini-track is to provide a forum for professionals and academics doing research on ICT in Middle Eastern countries to share and discuss their work.


Information Technology Issues in Transition Economies

Paulo Rupino da Cunha, University of Coimbra This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Grażyna Paliwoda-Pękosz, Cracow University of Economics This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

Transition economies are a particular case of emerging economies, including countries from the former eastern bloc and those that resulted from the breakup of the Soviet Union, which, in the last two decades, have abandoned the communist-style central planning system and committed to substantial reforms to adopt a free market approach.

These fast growing transition economies play an increasingly significant role in the global market, with information technology (IT) as a key driving force in this process. However, despite their growing importance, research that specifically addresses the specificities and different challenges of IT in transition economies is still scarce, when compared with the body of knowledge for developed countries.

The objective of this mini-track is to encourage more research in this topic by providing a forum for interested authors to disseminate their research, compare results, and exchange ideas.


IT Issues in Emerging Economies

Marlene Holmner, University of Pretoria This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Shana R Ponelis, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

The evolving growth of ICT in emerging economies such as the BRICS countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) has been remarkable in recent years and is likely to continue. These countries have become a leading market force, not just as ICT users but also as manufacturers of ICT services and goods. Although these countries are eagerly using and adapting ICTs to solve their real-life problems they face unique challenges compared to the established, developed economies. These challenges include high illiteracy rates, extreme poverty, and high mortality rates to mention a few. It is crucial for emerging economies to harness the power of ICTs to address these and other unique challenges more effectively.  Research contributions in this track will help to further equip those in emerging economies with the intellectual capacity to address these issues.


Role and Significance of ICT in Micro-Enterprises

Shana R Ponelis, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

With growing integration of corporations, public authorities, non-profit organizations, project teams, and individuals in cross-organizational, international and global settings, ICT collaboration is getting increasingly relevant. Cross-organizational and particularly international and global collaboration is much more complex than collaboration within one single organization. Critical success factors or challenges of ICT collaboration in such settings are for example different levels of ICT infrastructure, differences in business processes, cultural differences, legal regulations or the economic environment. The role of ICT in cross-organizational, international, and global collaboration is twofold: ICT can be a collaboration enabler, but also a collaboration purpose and goal. This mini-track focuses on conceptual and empirical research that contributes to a clearer understanding of international and global ICT collaboration processes, their challenges, success factors, and benefits in cross-organizational, international, or global settings. All methodological approaches, including case studies, surveys, literature reviews, design science etc. are welcome.


ICT Collaboration in Cross-Organizational, International, and Global Settings

Maria Madlberger, Webster Vienna Private University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

With growing integration of corporations, public authorities, non-profit organizations, project teams, and individuals in cross-organizational, international and global settings, ICT collaboration is getting increasingly relevant. Cross-organizational and particularly international and global collaboration is much more complex than collaboration within one single organization. Critical success factors or challenges of ICT collaboration in such settings are for example different levels of ICT infrastructure, differences in business processes, cultural differences, legal regulations or the economic environment. The role of ICT in cross-organizational, international, and global collaboration is twofold: ICT can be a collaboration enabler, but also a collaboration purpose and goal. This mini-track focuses on conceptual and empirical research that contributes to a clearer understanding of international and global ICT collaboration processes, their challenges, success factors, and benefits in cross-organizational, international, or global settings. All methodological approaches, including case studies, surveys, literature reviews, design science etc. are welcome.


ICT and Global Development in Developing Economies

Francis Kofi Andoh-Baidoo, University of Texas, Pan American This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

David Asamoah, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science & Technology This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) are important enablers of the socio-economic development of the developing economies. Often, the implementation of ICT is more challenging than in more developed economies, and a high level of adaptability and creativity is required.

For example, Sub-Saharan Africa is the larger of the two (Sub-Saharan and Arab) geopolitical regions of Africa. For many years, the African continent has been neglected in many ways including academics. However, a recent UN Outlook report indicates that several Sub-Saharan Africa countries have experienced better economic growth rates than those of the United States, Western Europe, and some Asian countries. Similar trends in economic growth rates could be observed in other developing regions.

The objective of this mini-track is to provide a forum for interested researchers for presenting and discussing these ICT issues specific to the developing economies.


ICT Innovation and Development

Alina Chircu, Bentley University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Jeffrey G. Proudfoot, Bentley University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has the potential to impact the development of individuals, regions, and countries around the world. However, there are many challenges, as ICT created for or in developed nations is unlikely to fit the unique developing country challenges, and developing countries often lack the mechanisms and conditions for successful local innovation. This mini-track invites submissions on ICT innovation in developing, transition and emerging economies to meet development goals – broadly defined around human, infrastructure, social, economic and political dimensions. We welcome both completed research and research-in-progress submissions using a variety of research approaches and methodologies. We are particularly interested in studies on ICT innovation opportunities, challenges, processes, and best practices, human-computer interaction issues, technology transfer, political, legal and economic frameworks, risks (including cybersecurity risks) and risk-mitigation, consequences (planned or unexpected, positive or negative), and implications of emerging ICTs (such as big data and novel collaboration technologies).


ICT and Sustainable Livelihoods in Rural and Underdeveloped Regions

Linda Jo Calloway, Pace University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Joseph Cazier, Appalachian State University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

This mini-track focuses on the numerous roles Information and Communications Technologies play in broadening opportunities to create sustainable livelihoods for everyone. Sustainable livelihoods include food and water, clean energy, education, health, and sustainable economic development for all. Population projections show that the earth will need to sustain another billion people in the next decade let alone another 25 billion in the next century. This mini-track will gather research and position papers, educational materials, conceptual models and cases on ICT initiatives aimed at creating economic, social and environmental sustainability in rural and underdeveloped regions. These endangered rural and underdeveloped regions also exist in the developed world.


Software in Developing, Emerging, and Transition (DET) Economies

Alexandra Kees, University Bonn-Rhein-Sieg This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Glenn Stewart, Queensland University of Technology This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

Software plays an important role in supporting managerial decisions, designing business processes, transforming economic exchange, and enhancing organizational capabilities. Software also enables the creation and delivery of new products, services, and business concepts. The role of software is therefore crucial in developing, emerging and transition (DET) economies to catch up with more developed countries. This mini-track invites theoretical and empirical submissions that address important research questions relevant to software in a DET context.

 


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