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Enterprise Systems (SIGENTSYS) Track

Carsten Brockmann, University of Potsdam This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Randy V. Bradley, The University of Tennessee This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Renee Pratt, Washington & Lee University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Track Description

The introduction, use and maintenance of enterprise systems (ES) require a significant investment of organizational energy and resources. As such, ES represent the largest IS investment an organization is likely to make. Many organizations are now upgrading, replacing, or extending their original ES. Early versions of ES provided back office functionality that integrated a range of internal business processes, whereas modern ES have evolved to include support for a variety of front office and inter-organizational activities and processes, such as customer relationship management (CRM) and supply chain management (SCM). The design of such large integrated systems represents a major technical challenge, requiring new ways of thinking about business processes, system development, and enterprise architecture.

Because of both their size and their integrated nature, ES are difficult to implement, and are associated with a variety of organizational changes. Organizations expect, but unfortunately do not always realize, significant benefits from their sizable investments in ES. Because of the importance of ES in organizations, educators continue to explore approaches for introducing ES into IS and other business curricula.

Mini-Tracks

Enterprise Architecture & Organizational Success

Frank Armour, J. Alberto Espinosa, Stephen Kaisler, William DeLone, Peter Loos

Teaching and learning Enterprise Systems

Lars-Olof Johansson, Ulrika Lundh Snis, Johan Magnusson, Glenn Stewart

Enterprise System Adoption and Business Models

Carsten Brockmann, Piotr Soja, and J.P. Allen

Enterprise Systems and Risk Management

Fernando Parra, Laura L. Hall

Enterprise System Upgrade and Maintenance

Klaus Turowski, Naoum Jamous


Enterprise Architecture & Organizational Success

Frank Armour, Kogod School of Business, American University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

J. Alberto Espinosa, Kogod School of Business, American University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Stephen Kaisler, SHK & Associates This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

William DeLone, Kogod School of Business, American University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Peter Loos, IWi at DFKI, Saarland University, Germany This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


Mini-Track Description / Call for Papers

Enterprise Architecting (EA) is the process of developing an enterprise Information Technology architecture – both its description and its implementation. An EA description focuses on a holistic and integrated view of the why, where, and who uses IT systems and how and what they are used for within an organization. An enterprise architect (and his/her team) develops the strategy and enables the decisions for designing, developing, and deploying IT systems to support the business operations as well as to assess, select, and integrate the technology into the organization’s infrastructure. Alignment between business and IT has remained one of the top three issues for CIOs and IS managers for several years as reported by CIO magazine.

An EA implementation focuses on remediating, renovating, or replacing IT systems in compliance with the EA description to achieve the proposed benefits.  EA is central to the execution of business strategies. Organizations vary in their degree of EA maturity. While the research literature has devoted substantial attention to the development of effective EA frameworks and the alignment of business and IT, there is very little empirical evidence about the organizational benefits of EA. For example, we know very little about which processes, approaches or coordination practices lead to an effective architecting effort or whether this effort leads to measurable organizational benefits.

Consequently, we are soliciting paper submissions that: advance our knowledge of EA; help us learn about effective processes and approaches to effectively manage the EA; and begin to identify ways to measure the organizational benefits derived from EA.

Possible Topics:

Architecting Processes, Methodologies and Practices

Architectural Frameworks and Theory

Tools and Techniques Supporting Architecting

Service-Oriented Architectures (including Web Services)

System versus Software Architectures

Addressing EA Challenges

Integration of EA with IT Governance and SOA

Surveys and Case Studies

EA and Organizational Success


Teaching and Learning Enterprise Systems

Lars-Olof Johansson, Halmstad University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Ulrika Lundh Snis, University West This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Johan Magnusson, University of Gothenburg This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Glenn Stewart, Queensland University of Technology This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

The mini-track Teaching and learning Enterprise Systems has a focus on the challenges and opportunities educators face when teaching Enterprise systems. The design, implementation and use of an enterprise system (ES) are a complex task; after all an ES is an example of a large integrated system spanning organizational boundaries. The mini-track are welcoming papers describing or exploring approaches to teaching the design, implementation or use of ES that enhances students learning..

Call for Papers

In this mini track, we are looking for ideas and practices that can improve teaching and learning related to Enterprise Systems. Papers submitted to this mini-track could be empirical or conceptual but they are all grounded in theoretical frameworks (pedagogical, didactical, Knowledge Management, organizational learning, educational technology etc.) relevant for studying teaching and learning in relation to enterprise systems. This track provides an opportunity for enterprise systems educators and researchers to exchange ideas, techniques, and best practices in order to support teaching and learning.

Potential Topics:

Teaching technical aspects of ES such as programming, databases, integration or architecture

Teaching organizational aspects of ES such as process orientation, BPM and value creation

Exploring new ideas in teaching and learning such as “flipped classroom”, “blended learning” or “ERP-Sim”

Creating curricula where ES are an integrated part

Challenges and opportunities related to teaching enterprise information systems online courses

Experiences of teaching with collaborative systems supporting educator–student interaction


Enterprise System Adoption and Business Models

Carsten Brockmann, University of Potsdam This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

Piotr Soja, Cracow University of Economics This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

J.P. Allen, University of San Francisco This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

Enterprise systems (ES) are extremely complex software packages designed for integrating data flow across an entire company, having emerged from earlier MRP, MRP II and ERP systems. Over time, ES have expanded to include more and more areas of an organization’s operations, and have extended beyond organizational boundaries to support interorganizational activities. Today’s enterprise systems are expected to support modern organizations that operate in dynamic and turbulent business environments, compete in global markets, face mergers and takeovers, and participate in business alliances and joint ventures.

This mini-track invites papers that examine various aspects related to the determinants of ES success and business models. Both empirical and theoretical papers are invited. The general research questions addressed in this mini-track can be formulated as follows: What are the mechanisms determining successful ES adoption? What are the underlying business models of companies delivering successfully adaptable ES? What kinds of new business models exist?

Call for Papers

Enterprise systems (ES) are extremely complex software packages designed for integrating data flow across an entire company, having emerged from earlier MRP, MRP II and ERP systems. Over time, ES have expanded to include more and more areas of an organization’s operations, and have extended beyond organizational boundaries to support interorganizational activities. Today’s enterprise systems are expected to support modern organizations that operate in dynamic and turbulent business environments, compete in global markets, face mergers and takeovers, and participate in business alliances and joint ventures.

Frequently, the adoption of an ES is an enormous challenge for an organization, due to system complexity, organizational context and the people involved in the implementation project. Usually, ES adoption is a long and multi-stage process during which various problems and complications may occur. Moreover, ES adoption projects typically involve a large number of stakeholders representing different departments, various organizational hierarchies, and often external companies operating in various industries. These stakeholders may have conflicting interests, and their own definitions of project success. Overall, ES implementation projects tend to be very unique and challenging endeavors.

Providers of enterprise systems have traditionally relied on strong revenues from maintenance fees, in addition to license revenue. Nowadays, shorter product lifecycles, rising consulting revenues, Open Source Software and SaaS are impacting their business models. ES providers have the challenge of delivering systems which are highly customizable software products, able to fit the needs of a variety of adopters. This might be important since, as prior research suggests, the issue of alignment between ES and adopting organizations is one of the determinants of successful enterprise system implementation.

This mini-track invites papers that examine various aspects related to the determinants of ES success and business models. Both empirical and theoretical papers are invited. The general research questions addressed in this mini-track can be formulated as follows: What are the mechanisms determining successful ES adoption? What are the underlying business models of companies delivering successfully adaptable ES? What kinds of new business models exist?

Potential Topics:

Motivation and justification for ES adoption

Alignment between ES and adopting organization

Barriers and impediments to ES adoption success

Risk factors in ES adoption

Critical failure factors for ES adoption

Critical success factors for ES adoption

Understanding of ES adoption success

Evaluation and benchmarking of ES projects

Multi-cultural and multi-national issues

Multiple stakeholder perspective in ES adoption and use

Business model frameworks for ES providers

Impact of new trends within the software industry on business models

Business model innovation for standard software companies

Implications of shorter product lifecycles on business models

SaaS related business models

Open source software related business models


Enterprise Systems and Risk Management

Fernando Parra,University of Texas at El Paso This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Laura L. Hall, Ph.D.,University of Texas at El Paso This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

The possibility that events will interfere with the achievement of a firm’s objectives demands appropriate risk management, which encompasses the assessment of financial and operational exposure, data integrity and the development of containment strategies.  Enterprise systems may pose unique risks due to the tightly interlinked business processes, customizations, and integration with other applications.  Key enterprise systems characteristics that impact security and internal control include degree of standardization, centralization, authorization, and access to functions, as well as automation of controls versus existing internal control structure. Enterprise systems may also present an opportunity for the integration of enterprise-wide risk management and compliance efforts.  The global rise of enterprise systems merits further examination of their role in relation to security management with a global lens.

Potential Topics:

Security management in the development, implementation and use of enterprise systems

Risk management in the development, implementation and use of enterprise systems

Use of enterprise systems for control management

Theoretical contributions to enterprise information security risk management

Corporate culture in enterprise risk management

Institutions, security, risks and enterprise systems

Risk mitigation value of enterprise systems

Regulatory compliance value of enterprise systems

Enterprise system security strategies

Enterprise systems impact on organizational culture as it relates to security


Enterprise Systems Runtime, Upgrade and Maintenance

Klaus Turowski, Otto-von-Guericke University – Magdeburg This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Naoum Jamous, Otto-von-Guericke University – Magdeburg This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-track Description

After adopting Enterprise systems (ES), many organizations struggle to obtain the benefits that were sought when choosing the system. This minitrack aims to discuss all related difficulties that organizations might face during the runtime, the upgrade, and the maintenance of ES. One of these challenges is the management of change (e.g. requirements engineering, end user involvement and training, user support, testing, etc.). Both, vendor's as well as customer's perspectives need to be taken into account.

This mini-track kindly invites full research submissions as well as research in progress papers.

Potential Topics:

Challenges during the runtime, and their implications on the organization's performance.

Data and schema transformation and updates

Scaling and performance management

Upgrades' effect on current customizations

Enterprise Systems security

Integration of bolt-ons in running ES

Implications of major and minor releases


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