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E-government (SIGEGOV) Track

Lemuria Carter,North Carolina A&T State University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Yogesh K. Dwivedi, Swansea University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Marijn JanssenDelft University of Technology This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Vishanth Weerakkody, Brunel University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Track Description

Emerging from e-business ideas in the late 1990s, e-government is seen as a concept that is focused on fully exploiting these advancements unlike any other initiative seen before in the public sector. Initially viewed as an alternative service delivery mechanism, e-government is now considered as a key enabler of public sector transformation for effective governance, transparency and accountability and citizen participation in democratic processes and policy making. E-government influences every aspect of daily life and covers a broad range of topics from service delivery to constituent participation and technology adoption to electronic governance. While many countries have implemented exemplary strategies that have enabled them to realize such benefits, others have struggled to cope with the diversity and complexity of implementation as well as adoption and diffusion challenges that e-government presents to the public sector. Although acknowledged as one of the most significant research themes to have emerged in the last decade, e-government has at times struggled to find its own niche in terms of theoretical relevance. It is often viewed as stemming from the IS field and in this respect, e-government has continued to have a major impact on IS theory and practice.

Mini-Tracks

From Implementation to Adoption: Challenges to Successful E-government Diffusion

Brandis Phillips, Vishanth Weerakkody,Yogesh K. Dwivedi, and Lemuria Carter

E-Government: Past, Present, and Future

Vikas Jain

Trends in Smart City Initiatives: Opportunities and Challenges

Uthayasankar Sivarajah,Vishanth Weerakkody, Ramzi El-Haddadeh, Zahir Irani, and Habin Lee

Framing Public Sector Big Data

Anne L. Washington, Laurie A. Schintler, and Connie L. McNeely

Cloud Computing in E-Government

Julia Kroenung andSatish Krishnan

E-Government Policy / Policy Informatics

Laurence Brooks, Natalie Helbig, and Marijn Janssen


From Implementation to Adoption: Challenges to Successful E-Government Diffusion

Brandis Phillips, North Carolina A & T State University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Vishanth Weerakkody, Brunel University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Yogesh K. Dwivedi, Swansea University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Lemuria Carter, North Carolina A & T State University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

The purpose of the mini-track is to encourage scholars to begin as well as to continue work in the e-government stream of research.  As change continues at all levels of government, managers are encouraged to facilitate more user friendly interactions with the public that are quick and efficient.  Great strides in increasing efficiencies are characterized as transformational government enabled by the implementation and use of technology.  As such, scholars need to continue to focus on these changes to provide direction and analysis on emerging trends related to adoption and diffusion of technology enabled services to the public.  Relevant research for this mini-track may include but not be limited to implementation and use/adoption of government technology and related services, IT governance, technology alignment, barriers to implementation and/or use, social media, big data or mobile applications. The mini-track continues the adoption and diffusion literature stream in e-government research.  Additionally emerging topics revolving around government IT including the use of mobile applications, social media, big data as well as ongoing issues with adoption and implementation warrant further study.

Call for Papers

Since the mid 1990s ICT has played an important role in incrementally changing and shifting traditional and bureaucratic government models into e-government structures where services are more conveniently delivered according customers’ needs. E-government implementation efforts have now evolved from basic information provisioning to more integrated service offerings in most countries. Having successfully e-enabled front office and customer facing processes during early e-government efforts, most countries are now working toward reengineering and e-enabling back office processes and information systems to facilitate citizen centric e-government services. These efforts are often referred to as the transformational stage of e-government or t-government. Conversely, many researchers have proposed various stages of e-government development; these revolve mainly around four phases, which are web presence, interaction, transaction and transformation. The transformational phase (or t-government) is considered the highest level of maturity for e-government programmes and encompasses redefining the delivery of government services by providing a single point of contact to citizens’ that makes the government transparent to citizens and businesses. Also, from a demand perspective, extensive efforts are required to increase citizens’ awareness about the transformation of the delivery of government services and their online availability akin to ubiquitous mobile commerce. In order to prevent a digital divide in terms of using e-government services, it is also necessary that citizens from all segments of society are equipped with basic ICT skills as well as private and or public access to high speed internet connections (i.e. through the use of broadband connections at home or in public places). The aforementioned issues may seem obvious; nonetheless, we believe that they are critical challenges to various governments’ plans for diffusion as well as citizens’ adoption of e-government services. Subsequently, there are also many technical, organizational, managerial and socio-economic challenges for successful implementation and adoption of e-government, which needs attention from various stakeholders including researchers and policy makers. The aim of this mini-track is to provide a common platform for discussion and presentation of original research highlighting issues related with technical, organizational, managerial and socioeconomic aspects of e-government implementation and adoption from both the government’s and citizen’s perspective.

Potential Topics:

Topics of research include, but are not limited to, the following:

The development, implementation, control and maintenance of e-government

Transformational government projects

Different process, information systems and technology integration approaches used in e-government and t-government projects

Enterprise architecture at various levels of government

IT-Governance, integrated service delivery and reengineering of the public sector

Barriers to awareness, adoption and diffusion of e-government services

Barriers to implementing transformational stage e-government (or t-government)

Evaluation of case studies

Technology alignments in e-government and t-government

Innovative applications and best practices in e-government and t-government

Overview studies; development within countries, policies, infrastructure facilities and comparative studies (comparing countries)

Role of high-speed internet in encouraging adoption and diffusion of e-government services

Role of socio-economic determinants in encouraging adoption and diffusion of e-government services

Policy and strategy to create and disseminate successful e-government services

E-government and digital divide

Social Media usage by government to engage its citizenry

Mobile application access to and usage of e-government services

Service provisioning in the public sector

Big data awareness among government IT staff as well as usage of tools and techniques for analysis


E-Government: Past, Present, and Future

Vikas Jain, University of Tampa This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

E-Government is an emerging paradigm to deliver government services to citizens, businesses, and other stakeholders through the use of Internet and information and communication technologies (ICTs). Over years, e-Government development has transitioned from cataloguing, transaction processing to vertical and horizontal integration in both developed and developing nations. The evolution of e-Government from the informational interfaces of the yester years to the transformational applications of today has in large measures been influenced by many of the contingent environmental factors. The development of e-Government has not been uniform across the world. Most nations are still struggling with their e-Government programs. Despite their tremendous transformational potential, the evidence about the success of e-Government efforts across various countries is mostly sporadic and diffused.

Call for Papers

The objective of this mini-track is to provide a forum for discussion and presentation of original research highlighting current issues related to technical, organizational, managerial and socio-economic aspects of e-Government adoption, evolution, implementation and impact. We seek to invite papers that address various aspects of e-Government projects from a theoretical, conceptual, or empirical perspective to set the stage for future research direction in e-Government. Both quantitative as well as qualitative studies on e-Government from developed and developing countries perspectives are encouraged.

Potential Topics:

The development and implementation of e-Government.

Frameworks for successful e-Government implementation

Social and economic impacts of e-Government

Effect of socio-economic factors in e-Government implementation and adoption

Cross country comparisons of e-Government projects

E-Government projects in developing countries and developed countries

Enablers and inhibitors of e-Government success

Models of electronic service delivery

Frameworks for e-Government evaluation

E-Government and E-Governance

E-Government readiness of government and citizens across countries

Role of technological and regulatory environment in e-Government implementation

E-Citizen and e-democracy

Emerging e-Government issues

E-government using mobile technologies


Trends in Smart City Initiatives: Opportunities and Challenges

Uthayasankar Sivarajah, Brunel University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Vishanth Weerakkody, Brunel University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Ramzi El-Haddadeh, Brunel University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Zahir Irani, Brunel University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Habin Lee, Brunel University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

The notion of smart city is emerging as a key strategy to tackle the problems generated by the urban population growth and rapid development. Smart city innovations are evolving as new approaches to holistic management of cities’ physical, socio-economic, environmental, transportation and political assets across all urban domains, typically supported by ICT. An effective smart city initiative is one that brings together technology, government and society to enable a smarter economy, mobility, environment, people, living and governance. However, as the smart city phenomenon itself is still emerging, the concept is being applied all over the world with different terminologies, context and meanings. This mini track invites work that frames smart city initiatives and explores its impact from a social, economic, technical or organizational perspective. Relevant topics may include areas that discuss smart city initiatives such as energy efficient cities, intelligent transport systems, smart communications and networks etc. The objective of the mini-track is to encourage research that can be useful to those engaged in smart city initiatives. Smart cities are strongly associated with public sector services including e-government research.   Research in Smart cities will provide the required level of continuity in understanding the impact and its innovative application of ICT in the context of public sector.

Call for Papers

The e-government era has enabled public administrations to become more efficient and effective through the delivery of digital solutions and services (West, 2004; Weerakkody and Dhillon, 2008). While the early emphasis of e-government led service transformation was highly focused on using technology to deliver improved and personalized services for citizens, more recent efforts have been focused on grassroots level impacts that are enabled through smart use of technology (Paskaleva, 2009). In this context, the emphasis has somewhat shifted from a service delivery focus to a smart ICT-infrastructure based eco-system that is sustainable. According to Lombardi et al. (2012), the application of ICT in the context of future cities is indicated by the notion of smart city.   Nevertheless, the smart city concept goes beyond the use of ICT for better resource use and less emissions. The notion of smart city is emerging as a key strategy to tackle the problems generated by the urban population growth and rapid development. Smart city innovations are evolving as new approaches to holistic management of cities’ physical, socio-economic, environmental, transportation and political assets across all urban domains, typically supported by ICT. An effective smart city initiative is one that brings together technology, government and society to enable a smarter economy, mobility, environment, people, living and governance (IEEE Smart Cities, 2014).

However, as the smart city phenomenon itself is still emerging, the concept is being applied all over the world with different terminologies, context and meanings.

This mini track invites work that frames smart city initiatives and explores its impact from a social, economic, technical or organizational perspective. Relevant topics may include areas that discuss smart city initiatives such as energy efficient cities, intelligent transport systems, smart communications and networks etc. In addition to empirical studies, theoretical and conceptual papers will be considered.  The objective of the mini-track is to encourage research that can be useful to those engaged in smart city initiatives.

Potential Topics:

Role of ICT in smart city initiatives

Role of Policy Makers in smart city initiatives

The development, implementation, control and maintenance of smart city initiatives

Transformational smart city initiatives

Different process, information systems and technology integration approaches used in smart city initiatives

Governance, integrated service delivery and reengineering of  smart cities

Barriers to awareness, adoption and diffusion of smart city initiatives

Evaluation of case studies

Technology alignments in smart cities

Innovative applications and best practices in smart cities initiatives

Overview studies; development within countries, policies, infrastructure facilities and comparative studies (comparing countries)

Role of socio-economic determinants in encouraging adoption and diffusion of smart city initiatives and associated services

Policy and strategy to create and disseminate successful smart city initiatives


Framing Public Sector Big Data

Anne L. Washington, George Mason University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Laurie A. Schintler, George Mason University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Connie L. McNeely, George Mason University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

Information systems designed to support internal processes now have a central role in commercial applications including big data. Third parties and related applications have enthusiastically embraced public sector data sources.  Unlike the private sector, the public sector has little control over secondary use of its material yet must withstand a higher level of scrutiny.  Conversely, governments obtain and analyze commercial data sources as well.  What challenges are facing public sector information systems in the era of big data?  This mini track invites work that frames government big data issues from technical, social, or organizational perspectives.  Relevant topics may include areas that generate significant government data, such as statistics, social services, healthcare, and education. The objective of the mini-track is to encourage research that can be useful to those employing and managing data in the public sector.

Call for Papers

The mainstreaming of e-government has created and facilitated the availability of an abundance of open government data.  Third parties and related applications have enthusiastically embraced public sector data sources.  Information systems designed to support internal processes now have a central role in commercial applications including big data.  Unlike the private sector, the public sector has little control over secondary use of its material yet must withstand a higher level of scrutiny.  Conversely, governments obtain and analyze commercial data sources as well.

Potential Topics:

This mini track invites work that frames government big data issues from technical, social, or organizational perspectives. In addition to empirical studies, theoretical and conceptual papers will be considered.

We encourage submissions that may include but are not limited to issues of policy, governance, diffusion, adoption, implementation, identification, privacy, cloud computing, or social media. Relevant research might be applied to areas that generate significant government data, such as statistics, social services, healthcare, and education.

The objective of the mini-track is to encourage research that can be useful to those employing and managing data in the public sector.


Cloud Computing in E-Government

Julia Kroenung, University of Mannheim This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Satish Krishnan, Indian Institute of Management This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

The emergence of the cloud computing paradigm shifts the way information technology (IT) is transforming service in today’s economy. Cloud computing provides scalable access, elastic and shared computing capabilities anytime and anywhere, and thereby requires minimum management and interaction with service providers. It promises efficiency gains and potential cost savings, which makes cloud solutions attractive to the public sector. However, due to different, often more restrictive security requirements, the implementation of cloud solutions in the public sector is different from the private sector. To enable public sector organizations to leverage the power of cloud computing, research is needed to address a number of issues. Therefore, we explicitly call for research on best practices and identification of problem areas in relation to cloud computing in e-government.

Call for Papers

The emergence of the cloud computing paradigm shifts the way information technology (IT) is transforming service in today’s economy. Cloud computing provides scalable access, elastic and shared computing capabilities anytime and anywhere, and thereby requires minimum management and interaction with service providers. Due to these characteristics, cloud computing has become an integral and vital component of almost every e-business activity. Concurrent with this, the potential of cloud computing for e-government is also widely acknowledged. To illustrate, in 2009, President Barack Obama and CTO Vivek Kundra expressed their vision to explore cloud computing as a key component in the federal IT transformation, which resulted in an increased agency use of cloud computing capabilities. Examples for promising application areas of cloud computing in e-government include cloud-supported e-voting, sustainable and cost-efficient infrastructures, cloud-enabled e-services, etc.

Business processes in public sector are often regarded as problematic as they are characterized by delay, mismanagement, and dysfunctionality. Such characteristics not only result in different affordances, and application areas and potentials of cloud computing in e-government, but also brings in several issues and challenges for governments, which include security, data protection and compliance, interoperability and data portability, identity and access management, and auditing, among others. In order to enable public sector organizations to leverage the power of cloud computing, research is needed to address such issues and challenges in depth. Therefore, we explicitly call for research on best practices and identification of problem areas in relation to cloud computing in e-government.

Potential Topics:

Adoption of cloud-based G2C e-services by citizens

Implementation of cloud-based G2G applications

Values of cloud-based e-government service platform for government, society and environment

Cloud computing in e-governance

Privacy and security issues of cloud computing in public sector

Collaborative innovation enabled by cloud computing through public-private partnership

Cloud computing and e-participation

Cloud computing and e-democracy (e.g., enablement of secure e-voting)

Cloud service models (e.g., IaaS, PaaS, SaaS) in e-government

Cloud deployment models (e.g., public cloud, private cloud, community cloud, hybrid cloud) in e-government

Best practices of cloud computing in e-government

Country-level comparison of cloud computing in e-government

Role of policymakers and IS professionals in enabling cloud computing in public sector

 


E-Government Policy / Policy Informatics

Laurence Brooks, Brunel University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Natalie Helbig, University of Albany This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Marijn Janssen, Delft University of Technology This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

Policy-making is the mechanism used to address societal problems, particularly by outlining and implementing desired rules, sanctions, behaviors, ideas and other measures that are believed to be able to solve the public problem. Policy-making, in the 21st century, is a complex, socio-technical process in which many stakeholders are involved, different technologies are used, and data and information are often in abundance. Traditionally, the role and impact of information communication technologies within the policy-making cycle have been limited. More recently, social media is one example where social technologies have begun to play a critical role in policy making processes and has influenced the resulting policies. Other developments have also influenced the traditional policy-making process, including big and open data, freedom of information laws, and crowdsourcing, or the wisdom of the crowds. All these developments have the potential to be used for enhancing citizens’ engagement with their government and to involve citizens more directly in the process. Information systems are an essential part of the policy-making process, yet limited research into the role and impact of these new developments on policy-making processes is available.

Call for Papers

In practice, policymakers themselves are often faced with conflicting public values and limited understanding of technological solutions to complex problems. For this reason, new platforms are introduced by government and non-profit organizations to enable richer citizen engagement, improve communication, and process larger volumes and more varied sources of semantically enriched linked data. These kinds of activities provide many opportunities to create models, particularly simulation models or serious games that capture reality more fully. The objective of this mini-track is to provide a forum for discussion and presentation of original research highlighting advances in policy-making through the advancement of new developments in technology and data. We seek papers addressing e-policy-making from theoretical, conceptual, or empirical perspectives in order to set the stage for future research in e-Government. Quantitative, qualitative, and conceptual studies are encouraged.

Potential Topics:

The development and implementation of e-policy-making

Theories and frameworks for e-policy-making

Institutions in policy-making

Policy-modelling and decision-making

Open policy-making, engagement and crowdsourcing

Cross-country comparisons

Enablers and inhibitors of e-policy-making adoption and success

E-Governance and government-citizens relationships

Open data and open government

Data science, policy informatics, big data, open data,

Agent-based simulation, gaming, visualization

Deliberation platforms

Citizen engagement

References

Lombardi, P., Giordano, S., Farouh, H. and Yousef, W. (2012). Modelling the smart city performance. Innovation: The European Journal of Social Science Research, 25(2), pp.137--149.

Paskaleva, K. (2009). Enabling the smart city: The progress of city e-governance in Europe. International Journal of Innovation and Regional Development, 1(4), pp.405--422.

IEEE Smart Cities, (2014). About | IEEE Smart Cities. [online] Available at: http://smartcities.ieee.org/about.html [Accessed 5 Sep. 2014].

Weerakkody, V. and Dhillon, G. (2008). Moving from e-government to t-government: a study of process reengineering challenges in a UK local authority context. International Journal of Electronic Government Research (IJEGR), 4(4), pp.1--16.

West, D. (2004). E-Government and the Transformation of Service Delivery and Citizen Attitudes. Public administration review, 64(1), pp.15-27.


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