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Human Capital in Information Systems Track (Sponsored by SIGLead)

James Denford, Royal Military College of Canada This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Paola Gonzalez, Dalhousie University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Track Description

The Human Capital in IS is aimed at fostering a forum for IS scholars engaging in a range of human capital related research including IS leadership, professional services and career development/training.  Specific objectives of the track are to allow members to share their research, engage in exchange of perspectives, and encourage future collaborations. The track is sponsored by the AIS Special Interest Group on IS Leadership (SIGLead) with this track forming an expansion of a theme on IS Leadership that has been hosted at AMCIS from 2003 through 2014.

Though articles on human capital abound in the practitioner press, much less attention has been devoted to the topic from an academic perspective. IS professionals – whether leaders at the CIO level, IS project and line staff or external professional service providers – are the human dimension of the discipline and therefore issues surrounding IS practice are of enduring concern to IS academics and practitioners alike. Mini-tracks cover the range of the track interest (divided between mini-tracks covering IS managers/leaders and IS professionals/workers) and authors will be encouraged to submit both conceptual and empirical papers that employ a variety of quantitative and qualitative methodologies.


IS Leadership Development in Human Capital in Information Systems Track

Jennifer E. Gerow, Virginia Military Institute This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

The IS Leadership Development mini-track is aimed at fostering a forum for IS scholars engaged in IS Leadership research to share their research, engage in exchange of perspectives, and encourage future collaborations. IS Leadership Development is broadly defined to include research on IS leaders such as CIOs and CTOs, including their roles and careers. Though articles on IS Leadership Development abound in the practitioner press, much less attention has been devoted to the topic from an academic perspective. The mini-track seeks to explore the various dimensions, theoretical bases, and perspectives on IS Leadership Development and to advance the state of scholarship on the issue. Authors are encouraged to submit both conceptual and empirical papers that employ a variety of quantitative and qualitative methodologies.

Possible Topics:

CIO and CTO Roles and Careers

CIO reporting structure

Strategic positioning within the organization

Characteristics of a successful leader

Managing success and failure

Technical Employee Development (i.e. Career Transition)

Promoting from within the company or hiring from the outside

Required skills for CIOs and CTOs

Qualifications for being promoted to CEO

IS succession planning

Non-Technical Employee Development (i.e. Career Transition for Non-IT Managers)

Preparation and development of non-technical executives for CIO and CTO positions in large enterprises

Preparation and development of non-technical executives for CIO and CTO positions for IS as a secondary role in SMEs

Importance of CIOs to have a “pure” IT background


IS Professional Development in Human Capital in Information Systems Track

Paola Gonzalez, Dalhousie University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

This mini-track seeks ground-breaking research regarding emerging issues facing the  computing workforce, talent management, career streams, professional development, and work-family balance of IS professionals, as well as ethical, societal, and legal issues related to managing computing professionals. This mini-track covers issues relating to computing professionals and human capital at any level of analysis including individual, department or workgroup, and industry level. Those studies which develop new theory or extend extant theory on issues such as the stigma associated with the computing profession or the professional identity of computing professionals are example papers one might expect in this mini-track. Additionally research on attracting students to the computing professions, global talent management, and developing a more diverse computing workforce are also welcomed. Furthermore, all methodologies and research paradigms that focus on computing-related personnel are appropriate for submission.

Possible Topics:

Workforce Issues

Legal, Societal, and Ethical Issues Related to Managing Human Computing Resources

Diversity in the Computing Field

Global Talent Management (e.g., Immigration vs Migration)

Emerging Issues facing the Computing Workforce

Retention and Refilling the Pipeline

Training

Career Issues

Needs, Interests and Abilities of Computing Professionals

Professional Commitment of Computing Personnel

Career Development Practices for Computing Professionals

Attracting Students to the Computing Professions

Individual Fit / Alignment with the Work Environment

Communication / Interaction (individuals, groups, networks, organizations)

Work-life Balance


Negative Cognitions about Information Systems

Taylor Wells, California State University, Sacramento This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Patrick Stacey, Lancaster University Management School This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Monideepa Tarafdar, Lancaster University Management School This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

NOTE: Submissions to this mini-track should be made to the “Attitude Adjustment” mini-track within the Human Computer Interaction track on the submission site (https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/amcis2015).

Mini-Track Description

There is an increasingly persistent dichotomy in the way that emerging IS-enabled patterns for work and collaboration are affecting users. The systems enable vast improvements in processes and decisions; however, they also lead to negative cognitions such as stress, frustration, addiction, distrust, and information overload. Given the ubiquity of IS use, the impacts of these detrimental conditions are potentially pervasive.

The objective of this mini-track is to develop theoretical insight and understanding on HCI topics and issues that address this “troubling” side of IS use. Submissions addressing all aspects of this topic are welcome. We welcome conceptual, theoretical or empirical research papers. We particularly welcome papers that apply theories and perspectives from different disciplines (e.g., theories of stress and deviant behavior from psychology, information overload and interruption from information science, and work-life balance from industrial management) to examine various aspects of this phenomenon.

Potential Topics:

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

Implications for design of systems and interfaces regarding:
Conceptualizations of troubling or negative interactions between IS and users, such as interruptions, information overload, constant connectivity to work-related information processing, negative emotions, and addiction to IS use.

Implications for design of systems and interfaces regarding:
Difficulties in learning how to use constantly changing technologies and applications, navigating requirements for security, and managing data deluge.

Implications for design of systems and interfaces regarding:
Outcomes from the above interactions such as stress and anxiety, difficulty in concentrating, multitasking, user dissatisfaction, effects on productivity and performance, disruption of work-life balance, and over-dependence on IS.

Implications for design of systems and interfaces regarding:
Use of IS in home contexts by outlier populations in terms of demographics such as age and wellness, e.g. managing apps on smartphones and tablets, and associated issues of personal data security, family well-being, and technology embedded-ness of home processes.

Any other HCI topics related to negative affective responses and the cause and effect relationships between cues embedded in system designs and/or methods that can mitigate or exacerbate those negative responses. These can include approaches such as gamification.

 


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