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Global, International, and Cross-Cultural Issues in IS (SIGCCRIS) Track

Edward W.N. Bernroider, WUVienna This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Pnina Fichman, Indiana University Bloomington This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Monideepa Tarafdar, Lancaster University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Track Description

Globalization has historically been tied to technological innovation, and the present era of a networked information society is no different. Information and communication technologies (ICTs) have provided the infrastructure for multinational businesses, created new cultural connections irrespective of geographic boundaries and distances, and allowed an increasingly mobile global population to be connected to their friends, families, and cultures no matter where they are. The issues surrounding global, international, and cross cultural issues in Information Systems (IS) attracted much scholarly attention and have been explored under myriad contexts. The track welcomes submissions that relate to all aspects of global IS, or IS research situated in a global, international or cross-cultural context. The track is open to all methodological approaches and perspectives.

Mini-Tracks

Knowledge Management and Collaboration in Global Information Systems

Mahesh S. Raisinghani

Issues in Global Systems Implementation

Aakash Taneja, Anil Singh, and George Mangalaraj

IT Culture and Values: Occupational, Organizational, and Societal

Indira R. Guzman and Michelle L. Kaarst-Brown


Knowledge Management and Collaboration in Global Information Systems

Mahesh S. Raisinghani, TWU, School of Management This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

While global organizations recognize that information and knowledge are vital to their operation, they do not know the best way to identify, value, cost, manage and realize the benefits of their intellectual assets. This is probably due to a knowledge gap between theory and practice.  A holistic focus on the content that includes knowledge and information as an integral part of the information system will lead to a more differentiated competitive advantage. As more countries join the ranks of the industrialized nations, the sophistication of the global market and the number of global competitors have eliminated any advantage to a simple presence in international markets. The focus of this mini-track will be on understanding the fundamental conditions of the industry and bridging the knowledge gap in global information systems.

Call for Papers

In learning from the past & charting the future of global information systems, the key question is what are the best and/or next practices in building a collaborative enterprise using global information systems?  While global organizations recognize that information and knowledge are vital to their operation, they do not know the best way to identify, value, cost, manage and realize the benefits of their intellectual assets. This is probably due to a knowledge gap between theory and practice.  Consequently, technology (viz., hardware, software, DBMS, networks) is often seen as a solution to the problem, rather than an increased focus on the content (viz., data, information and knowledge). A holistic focus on the content that includes knowledge and information as an integral part of the information system will lead to a more differentiated competitive advantage.

As more countries join the ranks of the industrialized nations, the sophistication of the global market and the number of global competitors have eliminated any advantage to a simple presence in international markets. The focus of this mini-track will be on understanding the fundamental conditions of the industry and bridging the knowledge gap in global information systems.

Potential Topics:

Best and next practices in building a collaborative enterprise using global information systems

Managing intellectual capital in MNEs/impacts of social, cultural, political, and economic issues

How knowledge management can be leveraged at the social level, in societies such as sub Saharan Africa

Knowledge management / multinational IT resource management

Case studies of applications and lessons learned from success and failure in knowledge management and collaboration in global information systems

Comprehensive reviews of previous studies on knowledge management and collaborative technologies in global organizations

Analyses of different research methods and their impact on the study of knowledge management and collaboration using global IT/IS in organizations and their contribution to theory

Global IT/IS to support innovation/creativity/knowledge management/ collaboration and the related governance issues (e.g., ODESK, ELANCE, LIVEOPS, INNOCENTIVE, TOPCODER, MECHANICAL TURK, CROWDFLOWER, CASTINGWORDS, SAMASOURCE, and so forth)

Cross-cultural issues related with the impact of conflicting national or organizational cultures on knowledge sharing


Issues in Global Systems Implementation

Aakash Taneja, Richard Stockton College This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Anil Singh, University of Texas at Brownsville This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

George Mangalaraj, Western Illinois University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

Globalization has spurred growth of trans-national and multi-national enterprises. It is imperative for these organizations to deploy systems that span multiple countries and continents. Implementation of such systems is fraught with challenges. Mainstream IS research on systems implementations have focused on single organization/country implementations. Findings from such studies may not be directly transferable to implementations where country is just not a variable but provides the implementation context. Moreover, organizations implementing systems across multiple countries have to deal with variances in the availability of skilled workforce, infrastructure, culture, laws and regulations. Studying such system implementation is trans-disciplinary. Novel theories and research methods that could shed light on such system implementations are encouraged. This mini-track invites research in the areas of global information systems development, implementation and usage to provide an increased understanding of the issues salient to global information systems implementations.

Call for Papers

Globalization has spurred growth of trans-national and multi-national enterprises. For these enterprises, integration of various information systems across different countries is imperative for their success. Implementing systems that seamless allow the flow of data as well as control beyond the boundaries of the home country is fraught with challenges. Technologies and implementation strategies used in the home country may not be readily transferable to overseas operations. Organizations have to necessarily adapt these to suit the local conditions. Implementation of global systems may be impacted by various environmental variables such as local rules and regulations, tariffs and currency differences. Perceptions and culture could also influence implementation strategies. Owing to this, the research in this area is requires some level of trans-disciplinary perspective.

Mainstream IS research on systems implementations have focused on many occasions on single organization and single country implementations. Findings from such studies cannot be generalized to systems implementations where the country is just not a variable but provides the context of implementation. There are both challenges and opportunities to consider in global systems implementations. Some of the challenges posed by the global implementation of systems include availability of trained manpower, technology limitations, local laws and regulations. Moreover, lack of internationalization and localization may also contribute in the implementation of global systems.

Scholarly research in this area will help academicians by providing an increased understanding of the issues salient to global information systems implementations. It will help practitioners better understand and proactively plan for implementation challenges. This mini-track invites research in the areas of global information systems development, implementation and usage. In echoing the conference theme, we also invite manuscripts that take trans-disciplinary perspective in studying the implementation of global systems. Moreover research that uses innovative research methods and theory are encouraged.

Potential Topics:

Theoretical underpinnings of failures and successes in global systems implementations.

Critical success factors of enterprise systems implementation spanning multiple countries.

Global enterprise systems and architectures.

Impact of newer IT provisioning methods (e.g., cloud computing) on global information system implementations.

Cultural, power equations, and demographic issues influencing global information systems implementation, adoption and usage.

Reconciling disparate accounting reporting systems (IFRS and GAAP), compliance requirements (SOX, COBIT, COSO) the use of technologies such as XBRL and XML in global systems.

Project management practices during the rollout of global IT systems.

Standardization of business process and technologies across multiple countries.

Project failures due to lack of internationalization and localization.

Differences in perceptions to e-commerce usage.

Cross border supply chain implementations in Maquiladoras, NAFTA, EU, ASEAN, etc.

Globally distributed teams in global systems implementations, such as the use of social media by cross-national virtual teams.

Global systems implementation governance and risks, such as issues related to strategic alignment, and roles and responsibilities.


IT Culture and Values: Occupational, Organizational, and Societal

Indira R. Guzman,Trident University International This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Michelle L. Kaarst-Brown, Syracuse University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

The research on culture and IT is diverse in both context and method. Our mini-track, now it its seventh year, addresses important cultural and value related aspects of information and communication technologies (ICT’s). Rather than focusing on only cross-cultural studies that compare IT development and use in different countries, the focus of this mini-track is to provide a broader forum for research that seeks to understand the values and assumptions embedded in ICT’s, and held by the human groups served by ICT’s (i.e. occupational groups, organizations, and society). It includes those who study the impact of cultural context.

Call for Papers

This year’s conference theme is “Blue Ocean Research – creating and exploring new areas of IS research”. It is interesting that “blue water”, a variation on this term, refers to going deep-water sailing out of the shallows, and so is especially fitting for those of us who explore cultural issues. The research on culture and IT is diverse in both context and method. Our mini-track, now it its seventh year, addresses important cultural and value related aspects of information and communication technologies (ICT’s). Rather than focusing on only cross-cultural studies that compare IT development and use in different countries, the focus of this mini-track is to provide a broader forum for research that seeks to understand the values and assumptions embedded in ICT’s, and held by the human groups served by ICT’s (i.e. occupational groups, organizations, and society). It includes those who study the impact of cultural context.

This rigorous mini-track is an attractive option of those who study cultural issues, but fall outside cross-cultural studies, as well as others whose research crosses topics, falls into general areas, special interest groups, or new “blue ocean research”.

Potential Topics:

IT culture, information culture, digital culture, online or social media culture, or the geek culture.

Methodological issues conducting IT and culture research in physical or digital environments

IT values and culture conflict, resolution and change in organizations and modern society

Culture, ICT’s and sustainability; Culture of “smart” organizations/groups

Culture and metaphors

Software for supporting cultural studies

Measuring or identifying IT cultural patterns or value sets

Culture of IT  innovation in high and low tech firms

The IT Occupational Culture; socialization, cultural fit, and commitment of IT people

Culture and values and ICT management or project management

Linking culture and information sharing

IT Culture and education

Culture and generational issues in IT use

Embedded cultural values in ICT’s

 

 


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