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End-User Information Systems, Innovation, and Organizational Change (SIG-OSRA) Track

Joao Porto de Albuquerque, University of São Paulo, Brazil This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

Frank Ulbrich, University of the Fraser Valley, Canada This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Track Description

The SIG-OSRA track focuses on advancing research and application of information and communication technologies in the end-user environment to support work processes, foster innovation, improve employee performance, and enhance overall organizational effectiveness in direct support of goals and strategies.

This year we invite research papers and teaching cases on topics related to integrating information and communication technologies in the workplace including leveraging end-user innovation, developing end-user oriented apps, managing business process, training and supporting end-users, managing knowledge, and coping with end-user technology adoption, assimilation, and use.

The track is open to all types of research. Best papers from the mini-tracks will be considered for submission to the Information Technology, Learning, and Performance Journal (ITLPJ).

Minitracks

Consumerization of IT - BYOD and Beyond
Rob Nickerson, Iris Junglas, and Sebastian Köffer

 

People, Organizations, and Boundaries in Value Creation
Lars-Olof Johansson and Jens Poeppelbuss

 

IT Consulting as a Change Agent
Paul Drews, Andreas Drechsler, and Volker Nissen

 

BPM from an End-User Perspective

Frank Ulbrich

 

Customers and Consumers as a New Challenge for End-User Computing
Paul Drews, Tilo Böhmann, and Elizabeth A. Regan

End-User Innovation and the Changing Nature of Work

Elizabeth A. Regan

 

Resilient Handling of Extreme Events in End-User Environments

Marcel Morisse and Claire Ingram


Consumerization of IT - BYOD and Beyond 

Rob Nickerson, San Francisco State University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Iris Junglas, Florida State University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Sebastian Köffer, University of Münster This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

Organizations are facing an expanding challenge in managing enterprise information technology: the consumerization of IT. The arrival of consumer-oriented devices and applications into the workplace is re-defining how corporate IT is adopted, delivered, and consumed. BYOD has become commonplace and use of cloud applications such as DropBox and Skype is ubiquitous among employees. End-users have mastered new digital technologies enough to begin to assert their independence from the constraints that the IT department has previously put in place to ensure the compliance, security, and stability of the corporate IT platform. While there is little academic research on the consumerization of IT, numerous industry-oriented articles have appeared and some conference papers have been presented. This dearth of publications highlights the need for theoretical and empirical investigation into this topic. The purpose of this minitrack is to provide a forum for presentation of research in this new and important area.

Call for Papers

Organizations are facing an expanding challenge in managing enterprise information technology: the consumerization of IT. The arrival of consumer-oriented devices and applications into the workplace is re-defining how corporate IT is adopted, delivered, and consumed. Personal devices such as smartphones and tablets may be brought to the workplace by employees (called BYOD) or provided by employers for use by the workforce to help employees in their jobs. Consumer-oriented applications, often in the cloud (such as Dropbox, Skype, Yammer LinkedIn, and GoogleDocs), may be used by employees for work-related activities with or without company sanction. While there is no single, universally accepted definition of IT consumerization, it can loosely be defined as the enterprise use of technologies that were originally designed for the consumer market.

End-users have mastered new digital technologies enough to begin to assert their independence from the constraints that the IT department has previously put in place to ensure the compliance, security, and stability of the corporate IT platform. Although the IT department has confronted “rogue” or “shadow” IT efforts in the past and dealt with “End User Computing” in the 1980s and 1990s, the recent technological advancements and the expanding level of IT literacy are changing the nature of how corporate IT and users of IT are managed.

While there are numerous industry-oriented articles on the consumerization of IT, little academic research has appeared. This dearth of research publications highlights the need for theoretical and empirical investigation into this topic. The purpose of this minitrack is to provide a forum for presenting research in this new and important area.

Potential Topics:

Managing BYOD and CYOD in the enterprise

Organizational impact of consumer-oriented devices and applications

New organizational structures for corporate IT (vs. private IT)

Competitive advantages enabled by IT consumerization

Organizational design impacts as private and business boundaries increasingly blur

Digital co-creation as end-users have access to increasingly sophisticated consumer tools

Behavioral impacts of IT consumerization, for example, impacts on employee morale and job motivation

Issues pertaining to inter- and intra-organizational ecosystems (e.g., implementing a digital innovation platform with internal and/or external partners)

Managing the imbalance between IT supply and demand (e.g., frustrated users who believe the IT department cannot deliver quickly enough)

Challenges to security brought on by employees using their own devices at work

IT support and IT governance issues brought on by the consumerization of IT

Legal issues pertaining to data ownership and terms-of-service liability


People, Organizations, and Boundaries in Value Creation

Lars-Olof Johansson, School of Information Science, Halmstad University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

Jens Poeppelbuss, University of Bremen This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

Organizations strive to become more process-oriented and co-creative when delivering value to their customers. A fundamental principle of both process orientation and value co-creation is to span boundaries within and across organizations. For boundary spanning, organizations, employees and customers (or people in general) rely on information systems as well as related techniques, models and methods. In today’s world, boundaries are becoming increasingly dynamic and therefore pose new challenges to information systems research. On the one hand, inter- and intra-organizational boundaries blur as people engage with each other on IT-based platforms. On the other hand, new boundaries can also emerge through the use of information systems in the process of creating customer value. Research on how organizations can manage and overcome intra- and inter-organizational boundaries with the help of information systems is subject of this mini-track. We encourage papers applying a wide variety of methodologies, including empirical, theoretical and design-oriented research.

Call for Papers

During the last twenty years or so, organizations have strived to become more process-oriented and also more co-creative when delivering value in terms of services and products to their customers. A fundamental principle of both process orientation and value co-creation is to span boundaries within and across organizations. For boundary spanning, organizations, employees and customers (or people in general) rely on information systems as well as related techniques, models and methods.

In today’s world, boundaries are becoming increasingly dynamic. On the one hand, inter- and intra-organizational boundaries blur as people engage with each other in social media or other virtual communities. Organizations utilize web-based platforms with externals, e.g., in order to gather ideas for innovations from their customers and to streamline operations with business partners. Looking at the internal of the organization, employees are expected to participate actively in business process management (e.g., in terms of Social BPM), knowledge management and organizational learning in order to create customer value and, of course, increased corporate revenue. On the other hand, new boundaries can also emerge through the use of information systems in the process of creating customer value. Reasons for this are manifold, including digital connections that do not work instantaneously due to incompatible information systems, work practices that are not synchronized, and diverging organizational cultures.

This mini-track intends to serve as a platform for research on the intersections between business process management, knowledge management and organizational learning, taking a boundary spanning perspective. We invite contributions from various disciplines including information systems, information management, organization, science, computer science and management science. Interdisciplinary research that connects the aforementioned areas is also welcome. We encourage papers applying a wide variety of methodologies, including quantitative and qualitative, empirical and theoretical research such as case studies, action research, surveys, experiments, and design science.


 “IT Consulting as a Change Agent”

Paul Drews, Leuphana University of Lüneburg This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Andreas Drechsler, University of Duisburg-Essen This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Volker Nissen, University of Technology Ilmenau This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

Over the past few decades, the influence of the IT consulting industry on the use and the management of IT in enterprises has increased dramatically. Many enterprises rely on IT consulting services, and IT consultants often act as change agents for their clients. They are assigned to analyze, propose, and implement IT innovations, they serve as an HR outsourcing partner for the IT department, and with many of their projects they aim to change the client’s socio-technical configuration. IT consultants can also serve as facilitators to transfer IS research outcomes to actual organizational and IT changes in practice and can thus contribute to the relevance of IS research. But despite the prevalence of IT consulting projects in practice, IS research has not covered IT consulting very intensively. Therefore, IT consulting research can be regarded as a “blue ocean research” endeavor in the sense of the conference theme.

 Call for Papers

Over the past few decades, the influence of the IT consulting industry on the use and the management of IT in enterprises has increased dramatically. Many enterprises rely on IT consulting services, and IT consultants often act as change agents for their clients. They are assigned to analyze, propose, and implement IT innovations, they serve as an HR outsourcing partner for the IT department, and with many of their projects they aim to change the client’s socio-technical configuration. IT consultants can also serve as facilitators to transfer IS research outcomes to actual organizational and IT changes in practice and can thus contribute to the relevance of IS research.

But despite the prevalence of IT consulting projects in practice, IS research has not covered IT consulting very intensively. Therefore, IT consulting research can be regarded as a “blue ocean research” endeavor in the sense of the conference theme. Several challenges are specific to the IT consulting industry: Existing methods used in different IS fields (such as process management, enterprise architecture analysis, etc.) have to be adopted to fit the efficiency constraints in consulting projects, methods may need to be tailored to fit existing consulting products; and consulting companies are one of the drivers for fashion waves in the IT industry.

This mini-track aims to provide a forum for IT consulting research in the IS discipline.

Potential Topics:

Topics relevant to this mini-track may include but are not limited to:

IT consulting from a service science perspective

IT consulting from a consulting research perspective

Theoretical foundations of IT consulting research

IT consultants as change agents

HR-related issues in IT consulting

Methods, method developing and method adoption in IT consulting

IT consulting from a management perspective

IT consulting as HR outsourcing for the IT department

Virtual IT consulting / telepresence in IT consulting

Micro-tasking in IT consulting

Knowledge management in IT consulting firms

Education and training of IT consultants (skills & competencies, job profiles, education topics, and teaching experiences)

The use of IT in IT consulting companies

The relationship between IT consulting and strategy consulting

The organization of internal consulting departments

IT consultants as enterprise engineers (e.g. enterprise architecture from a consultant’s perspective)

Business processes of IT consulting companies

The potentials and limitations of research transfer in cooperation with IT consulting companies.

We welcome conceptual, empirical, and design-oriented contributions for this mini-track.


BPM from an End-User Perspective

Frank Ulbrich, University of the Fraser Valley This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

End users are usually the ones that best know how business process are working in real life in their organizations. Business process modelling is known as a way to assist in better understanding business process in an organization. End users, however, have difficulties in accurately explaining and modelling organizational processes.

Call for Papers

End users are usually the ones that best know how business process are working in real life in their organizations. Business process modelling is known as a way to assist in better understanding business process in an organization. End users, however, have difficulties in accurately explaining and modelling organizational processes.

This minitrack focuses on effective techniques for modelling business processes from an end user perspective. We welcome empirical and theoretical contributions.

Potential Topics:

Best practices

Real-work experience

Evaluations of different modelling techniques

Novel modelling techniques

The end-user’s role in process modelling


Customers and Consumers as a New Challenge for End-User Computing

Paul Drews, Leuphana University of Lüneburg This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tilo Böhmann, University of Hamburg This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Elizabeth A. Regan, University of South Carolina This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Mini-Track Description

The field of end-user computing has successfully put a focus of research in IS development and implementation on empowering the users. However, today, the term “user” needs to be redefined as many organizations dramatically extend the number of people using their IT systems. Customers, consumers, partners and other stakeholders are now becoming users of the organizations’ IT. These groups may comprise several hundreds of thousands or even millions of people with different IT skills and hardware. They are acting in diverse and often unknown contexts. Mobile applications, web shops and web portals are the bridges between an organization and its customers and consumers. Traditional ways of providing training, support, empowerment, and innovation need to be rethought with regard to this extended use.

Call for Papers

The field of end-user computing has successfully put a focus of research in IS development and implementation on empowering the users. However, today, the term “user” needs to be redefined as many organizations dramatically extend the number of people using their IT systems. Customers, consumers, partners and other stakeholders are now becoming users of the organizations’ IT. These groups may comprise several hundreds of thousands or even millions of people with different IT skills and hardware. They are acting in diverse and often unknown contexts. Mobile applications, web shops and web portals are the bridges between an organization and its customers and consumers. Traditional ways of providing training, support, empowerment, and innovation need to be rethought with regard to this extended use.

Like the internal IT users, consumers and customers are much more experienced in using IT today. Hence, organizations are also facing increased expectations if they provide IT systems to their customers and consumers. Contrary to their internal IT users, they cannot draw on established governance structures or impose direct pressure. Instead, organizations are to an increasing degree driven by the progress of consumer technology and leading web-based systems, which are known and used by their customers and consumers. The IT management in organizations is therefore in the need to find new structures for interacting with customers and consumers (e. g. in the fields of demand management, innovation management, service provision).

With this mini-track, we seek to attract research, which is related to the well-established field of end-user computing. In accordance with the conference theme of “blue ocean research”, we encourage the submission of work that extends this field by also considering customers and consumers as end-users.

Potential Topics:

Customers and consumers as end-users of IS

Achieving a better understanding of the customers’ and consumers’ needs

Establishing and maintaining IT-related communication channels with customers and consumers

Empowering the customer and consumer with flexible IT systems

Methods for reducing the time needed for training

Integrating consumers and customers in IT-related innovation processes

Training and support services for customers and consumers

Entrepreneurial and small companies as end-users

New roles and tasks in organizations related to the IT-based interaction with consumers and customers

IT skills customers and consumers

Consumerization of IT

Customer-oriented and consumer-oriented cross-department collaboration (e. g. between IT, marketing, sales)

Challenges of the IT organization / IT management facing the customers and consumers

New methods for managing the IT department’s interaction with the customer and consumer

We welcome conceptual, empirical, and design-oriented contributions for this mini-track


End-User Innovation and the Changing Nature of Work

Elizabeth A. Regan, University of South Carolina This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

Much of today’s innovation comes at the intersection of business practice and technology integration. It demands trans-disciplinary systems approaches that engage end-users, bridge silos, and extend organizational boundaries. It impacts both the organization and the roles of workers, and often relationships with customers as well. This is an area that has gotten little coverage in the research literature. Although the literature suggests that workers on the frontlines are often the source of solutions not readily evident at management levels, little research is available on the role of end-users, appropriate approaches for engaging them, or the impact on work itself. Technology enabled business solutions generally require both technology savvy and business expertise, but marrying these two successfully is often challenging and sometimes illusive from both a technology and an organizational perspective. Exploratory, theoretical, empirical and descriptive (case studies) papers related to technology enabled end-user innovation are invited.

Call for Papers

Much of today’s innovation comes at the intersection of business practice and technology integration. It demands trans-disciplinary systems approaches that engage end-users, bridge silos, and extend organizational boundaries. It impacts both the organization and the roles of workers, and often relationships with customers as well. This is an area that has gotten little coverage in the research literature. Although the literature suggests that workers on the frontlines are often the source of solutions not readily evident at management levels, little research is available on the role of end-users, appropriate approaches for engaging them, or the impact on work itself. Technology enabled business solutions generally require both technology savvy and business expertise, but marrying these two successfully is often challenging and sometimes illusive from both a technology and an organizational perspective.

This mini-track seeks to create a forum for researchers with an interest in this topic Exploratory, theoretical, empirical and descriptive (case studies) papers related to technology enabled end-user innovation are invited.

Potential Topics:

IT end-users as innovators

Gaining end-user buy-in to new technologies and innovations

Organizational infrastructure that supports technological innovation

Industry specific issues and approaches – such as transforming medical practice with electronic medical records and health information exchange

The role of knowledge management in end-user innovation

The role of training in end-user innovation

Business unit led technology innovation

Business leaders as technology innovators

Impact of disruptive technologies on end-users

Gaining management approval for end-user innovations

Project management of end-user innovation

Building organizational buy-in for end-user driven innovation


Resilient Handling of Extreme Events in End-User Environments

Marcel Morisse, University of Hamburg This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Claire Ingram, Stockholm School of Economics This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

The ubiquity of information technology (IT) innovations, like Web 2.0 and social media, has led to the creation of new ways of doing business, including new organizational forms and new forms of value creation. In particular, the end user has become an integral part of many organizations’ innovation and efficiency models. Yet the presence of end users introduces both new risks and new ways of dealing with risks. These risks may take the form of extreme events such as natural disasters (earthquakes), terrorist attacks, or economic crises, or smaller events (loss of organizational assets). Just as the inclusion of end users in innovation has given organizations and entrepreneurs a competitive advantage, the ability to handle extreme events is key to maintaining advantages – as well as to the sustainability of the organization itself. Indeed, the end user itself may be a key resource in handing or predicting an extreme event.

Potential Topics:

Theories, models, approaches and concepts of resilient handling of extreme events in end-user environments

Cooperation, coordination and communication during extreme events

Emergent and evolving behavior during extreme events between different actors in ecosystems

Case studies on extreme events in in end-user environments

Resilient IT infrastructures

Extensions to IT management methods in order to comprise resilient handling of extreme events.

Role and possibilities of new technologies and innovations for handling extreme events.

Communicative visualization approaches comprising complex extreme events, resilient handling of extreme events, reporting/modeling on different levels of granularity

Evaluations of advantage/disadvantage of world-wide standardization and centralization efforts

Cultural issues in handling extreme events in end-user environments

Research methods and theories suitable for guiding research on extreme events in end-user environments

REFERENCES

Gutschick, V. P., BassiriRad, H. (2003) Extreme events as shaping physiology, ecology, and evolution of plants: toward a unified definition and evaluation of their consequences. New Phytologist 160, pp. 21–42

Vogus, T.J., & Sutcliffe, K.M. (2007) Organizational Resilience: Towards a Theory and a Research Agenda. IEEE Systems, Man, and Cybernetics 2007 Proceedings, pp. 3418-3422.

  


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