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Adoption and Diffusion of Information Technology (SIGADIT) Track

Heshan Sun, Clemson University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Andreas Eckhardt, Goethe University Frankfurt This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Track Description

Along with the advances in information technology, adoption and diffusion of information technology continues to be a valuable topic. In the new technological environments such as the quick spread of cloud computing and Big Data, researchers who study adoption and diffusion of IT need to take new paths to conduct “blue ocean” research in this area. In terms of methodologies, using mixed and novel methods for collecting (i.e. surveys, experiments, simulations, mixed methods) and analyzing data (latent growth models, event studies, agent based modeling, multi-level analysis, diary studies, data- and text- mining) can provide a significant step forward. Hence, we call for scholarly effort investigating adoption and diffusion of IT with new theoretical perspectives and novel empirical and/or analytical methodologies providing new insights and limiting bias to achieve a more holistic understanding about why and how people use IT.The purpose of this track is to deeper our understanding of the important issues of adoption and diffusion of information technology.

Mini-Tracks

Diffusion, Adoption, and Assimilation of IS Innovations

Anand Jeyaraj

Unintended Drivers and Consequences of Technology Usage

Sven Laumer and Christian Maier


Diffusion, Adoption, and Assimilation of IS Innovations

Anand Jeyaraj, Wright State University This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

Diffusion, adoption, and assimilation (DAA) are related processes that describe how an information systems (IS) innovation may become ingrained among individuals within a social system. Diffusion refers to the processes by which individuals become aware of an innovation; adoption represents the processes by which individuals make the decision to accept the innovation; and assimilation describes the processes by which individuals appropriate the innovation for everyday use. Although a significant body of literature describes factors that influence adoption and assimilation (or post-adoption or continuance) largely based on cross-sectional research, there is a lack of evidence on the processes of DAA over time. Specifically, little is known about the various steps/stages by which individuals become aware of, decide to use, and appropriate IS innovations. Consistent with the conference theme of “Blue Ocean Research,” we solicit theoretical expositions and empirical investigations that provide novel and unique insights into the processes of DAA.

Potential Topics:

Alternate theories, models, and patterns of DAA

Ways in which communication channels affect DAA processes

Ways in which positive and negative communication affect DAA processes

Ways in which formal and informal relations affect DAA processes

Ways in which strong and weak ties affect DAA processes

Ways in which championship and behavioral modeling affect DAA processes

Ways in which central and peripheral individuals affect DAA processes

Political moves underlying DAA processes

DAA processes in mandatory vs. voluntary use contexts

DAA processes for instrumental vs. hedonic IS


Unintended Drivers and Consequences of Technology Usage

Sven Laumer, Otto-Friedrich University Bamberg This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Christian Maier, Otto-Friedrich University Bamberg This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mini-Track Description

Research in the past identified several positive and intended drivers as well as consequences of technology usage, which system designers have in mind when designing and implementing technologies. However, there is also research and practical observations indicating that technology usage is related to unintended and rather negative drivers that are the breeding ground for some unintended behaviors and consequences. Unintended drivers include beliefs like information overload, social overload, or dissatisfaction, unintended behaviors include user resistance behaviors or the manifestation of workarounds, and unintended consequences include stress, frustration, or employee turnover.

The objective of this mini-track is to focus on unintended drivers and consequences of technology usage to provide system developers guidelines to avoid these rather negative aspects when designing and implementing technologies. We welcome different kinds of theoretical perspectives focusing on both private and organizational usage of technology and its consequences for individuals, organizations, and society by using various research methodologies.

Call for Papers

In line with the AMCIS 2015 theme “Blue Ocean IS Research” we call for research that focuses on unintended drivers and consequences of technology usage. By focusing on different technologies in a private or workplace context, by providing novel theoretical perspective and by using various research methodologies papers submitted to the AMCIS 2015 Mini Track on “Unintended Drivers and Consequences of Technology Usage” should provide system developers and implementers new insights into unintended phenomena related to technology usage. Research in the past has identified several positive and intended drivers and consequences of technology usage, which system designers have in mind when designing and implementing technologies. They focus on system or information quality, perceived ease of use and usefulness to increase individual and organizational net benefits, productivity, adoption, usage, or user satisfaction.

However, there is also research and practical observations that indicate that technology usage is related to unintended and rather negative drivers and that also some unintended behaviors and consequences can occur. Unintended drivers include beliefs like information overload, social overload, or dissatisfaction, unintended behaviors include user resistance behaviors or the manifestation of workarounds, and unintended consequences include stress, addiction, or employee turnover. These unintended drivers and consequences are to some extent not covered by the initial system design as they are rather unintended and occur when the technology is implemented and used.

Potential Topics:

Therefore, the objective of this mini-track is to focus on unintended drivers and consequences of technology usage to provide system developers guidelines to avoid these rather negative aspects when designing and implementing technologies. Papers might focus on one of the following aspects, but are not limited to:

Drivers and consequences of different types of user resistance behaviors

User’s workarounds

Organizational strategies to avoid user resistance

Drivers and consequences of technostress

Individual and organizational coping mechanisms to avoid technostress

Drivers and consequences of technology addiction

Strategies to address technology addiction

Social influence on technology acceptance

User personality and technology acceptance

Privacy threats when using technology

We welcome different kinds of theoretical perspectives focusing on both private and organizational usage of technology and its consequences for individuals, organizations, and society by using various research methodologies.

 


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